Helen (heleninwales) wrote,
Helen
heleninwales

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Three random things make a post...

This must be a writer's nightmare. What would you do if the production department and/or typesetters cocked up a pretty important element of your book?

Having finished reading Jasper Fforde's latest novel First Among Sequels, I decided to take a look at his web site for any additional titbits or Making Of Wordementories etc. (I really like Jasper Fforde's sites for the various books and also the Goliath merchandising. I bought a T-shirt off them last year.)

So I see a link saying, "Click here for missing text..." and follow it.

Most of the corrections are pretty trivial, a missing letter or incorrect word, but then I made my way down to a heading about Footnote Upgrade Alert

It has come to our attention that the entire first print run of the UK Hodder edition of First Among Sequels is missing the footnoterphone speech. These should be on pages 194, 195, 332, 333, 339, 392 and 393. This is especially annoying as it is the second side of dialogue, some of which moves the story on.

I'd thought it was odd when I read it that I was only getting one half of the phone conversations, but you know how there are two conventions when it comes to doing phone calls: you can either hear the person at the other end or you can't? Well, I'd assumed he'd changed the way he was doing them. But apparently not. Poor Mr Fforde.

Anyway, he has kindly supplied a PDF to print out. I now need to cut out the snippets and glue them into the correct pages.

In other news...

This[*] was found via truepenny. I'd heard about cheese rolling before, of course, seeing as it's a British sport, but I didn't know the Japanese had heard about it and sent an intrepid reporter to take part. After all those programmes in which we laugh at the mad Japanese doing crazy and dangerous things in the name of entertainment, I love the thought that there are people in Japan laughing at the mad British doing crazy and dangerous things...

And finally, if that wasn't bizarre enough, the world really never does cease to surprise me.

Scott Mills (Radio 1 DJ) started a campaign to get this song to number one. It's currently hovering at number 27, but it is there in the British charts and causing a good deal of merriment. It's the shortest song ever to make it into the top 30.



[*] Link doesn't seem to be working at the moment, but it was fine yesterday. I'm hoping it will recover.
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