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Where is my proper June weather? - Helen's journal and online home
In which an old dog attempts to learn new tricks.
heleninwales
heleninwales
Where is my proper June weather?
June is supposed to be one of the most beautiful months in the UK. What happened!!?? Floods in Mid-Wales and a constant steady downpour further north where we are. And this is despite the BBC weather forecast saying we should be having a dry day with cloudy skies. I have been waiting all morning for the rain to stop so I could nip out to the shops, but I'm just going to have to get wet. :(

Meanwhile the back garden is thriving on all this and the grass is nearly waist high! And according to the longer term forecast, there's absolutely no chance of getting it cut for most of next week.

I am so glad I got the old shed demolished and burned on a bonfire when I did. I had a sense of it being a race against the weather, but little did I know that if I'd missed that chance, it would be weeks before it was dry enough again.

[Cross-posted from Dreamwidth by way of a backup http://heleninwales.dreamwidth.org/47040.html. If you want to leave a comment, please use whichever site you find most convenient. Comments so far: comment count unavailable.]

Current Mood: cranky peeved

22 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
readthisandweep From: readthisandweep Date: June 9th, 2012 10:48 am (UTC) (Link)
One of my visitors found herself stranded yesterday evening, at Machynlleth. The train company were going to abandon them! The passengers revolted & eventually, my visitor was taxied to Lampeter, along with one or two others.

I'm now wondering if they (I have three of them) will be able to get away on Monday. They are due to travel to Scotland!

Eighty people airlifted in Aber & there's up to five feet of water in places. I don't envy Talybont!

The sky is innocently blue right now - Lampeter is pretending like mad. But there is more to come I fear.
green_knight From: green_knight Date: June 9th, 2012 02:43 pm (UTC) (Link)
I used to live in Dol-y-Bont, down by the river. I am right now *extremely* glad to have moved. (I also used to live a few hundred yards from the path of the Bow Street tornado. Hm.)
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 09:44 am (UTC) (Link)
It was one of those freak events. Apparently elderly inhabitants in their late 80s and 90s had never seen anything like it, or heard stories of it happening before. It may be a similar event to the floods that occurred here in 2001 which G based quite a bit of his Ph.D. on. That was a huge storm event that remained stationary over a small area and the rivers just couldn't cope with the run-off.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 09:41 am (UTC) (Link)
I hope your visitors got away safely. The weather is all innocence again here now. We even have patches of blue sky.
readthisandweep From: readthisandweep Date: June 10th, 2012 11:02 am (UTC) (Link)
I'm driving them to Aberystwyth first thing in the morning. Hopefully, the trains are running.

Meanwhile - yes - let's put the kettle on! Again!
blackberry44 From: blackberry44 Date: June 9th, 2012 11:41 am (UTC) (Link)
For once we have been having better weather than the rest of the country, (for some values of better!)and it's sunny although slightly overcast. It is, however, still freezing cold, well, for June anyway.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 09:45 am (UTC) (Link)
It has indeed been better up in the North of England and Scotland recently. It's almost as though the good weather is following the Olympic Torch around!
carl_allery From: carl_allery Date: June 9th, 2012 01:22 pm (UTC) (Link)
Blue skies, which I've been expecting to turn grey and wet all morning - which is why I haven't attempted to get to Yeovil to cut my knee-high grass there. :( Plus, of course, the weather here is no indicator of the weather there ...
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 09:47 am (UTC) (Link)
Indeed. Weather can be very localised. The floods were very likely one of those freak events. Apparently elderly inhabitants in their late 80s and 90s had never seen anything like it, or heard stories of it happening before. It may be a similar event to the floods that occurred here in 2001 which G based quite a bit of his Ph.D. on. That was a huge storm event that remained stationary over a small area and the rivers just couldn't cope with the run-off.
pickledginger From: pickledginger Date: June 9th, 2012 01:46 pm (UTC) (Link)
Crazy new climate we have here. Sigh.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 09:47 am (UTC) (Link)
The floods were very likely one of those freak events. Apparently elderly inhabitants in their late 80s and 90s had never seen anything like it, or heard stories of it happening before. It may be a similar event to the floods that occurred here in 2001 which G based quite a bit of his Ph.D. on. That was a huge storm event that remained stationary over a small area and the rivers just couldn't cope with the run-off.
pickledginger From: pickledginger Date: June 10th, 2012 02:03 pm (UTC) (Link)
The thing is, "freak" weather events are becoming more common.

Rain, increasingly, is tending to fall all at once, so drought and flood in alternation. Last week, the area around Pensacola, Florida, got 13-some inches in 24 hours ... with predictable results. Large portions of Wales went sub-riverene. This week, it may be someplace else.

The pattern of larger, more frequent temperature extremes, such as the 100-plus days of 100-plus °F last year in Texas, also has been found to be statistically significant.


The book Eaarth has an interesting discussion of the way in which weather patterns -- rainfall, temperature, storm frequency and intensity -- already have changed. Plant and animal populations already are being affected ... as are insurance companies.

Weather. We'll be seeing more of it.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 03:18 pm (UTC) (Link)
Yes, indeed. There is much more energy in the weather system. The event that occurred near here on 3 July 2001 was probably a once in 200 years event, but now something not dissimilar has happened a bit further south just over 10 years later. As I said, my husband's Ph.D. was about the changing weather patterns, including possible ways to predict flooding and ways of mitigating the effects. if you go here some of his research is online (warning, large PDF file). If you click through to page 17, you can see photos of the devastation that flood caused.
green_knight From: green_knight Date: June 9th, 2012 02:44 pm (UTC) (Link)
It *is* proper weather. For autumn.

I hope your skies will clear soon - here' it's dry enough that all of my neighbours seem to be wanting to cut their grass on the same day, which is less than happy-making.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 09:49 am (UTC) (Link)
Actually, it's the freak summer storms that can be more devastating than winter ones. The huge storm that took place here in 2001 happened in early July, so basically around this time of year.
muuranker From: muuranker Date: June 9th, 2012 07:08 pm (UTC) (Link)
In the early 1980s I went to a lecture by a BBC weatherman, who was, in questions, asked about climate change. Back then, it was quite an arcane topic, but he summed it up: buy 100m above sea level, or more.

I think our weather patterns have significantly changed: April and May are hot, but June, July and August are cloudy and cool. Winters are drier, warmer, but some prolongued periods of snow.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 09:52 am (UTC) (Link)
The floods in Dol-y-Bont were very likely one of those freak events. Apparently elderly inhabitants in their late 80s and 90s had never seen anything like it, or heard stories of it happening before. It may be a similar event to the floods that occurred here in 2001 which G based quite a bit of his Ph.D. on. That was a huge storm that remained stationary over a small area and the rivers just couldn't cope with the run-off. There was severe flood damage well above the 100m mark, but it was excess water run-off flooding, not big rivers bursting their banks and flooding the water meadows flooding.
pickledginger From: pickledginger Date: June 10th, 2012 02:17 pm (UTC) (Link)
Yes, weather is changing. It's official, or at least, it's statistically significant. Rainfall and humidity patterns are shifting, heat waves are hotter, cold waves are colder, droughts and fires and floods and tornadoes (like those last month in Montreal) are more common. Yippee. :-/

So far, the changes look to be a lot like those predicted for our increasingly energetic ecosphere, if a bit ahead of the median projections.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 03:27 pm (UTC) (Link)
Living with a geologist makes you very aware of how the whole planet -- continents, weather and everything -- is in constant flux. There are pillow lavas at the top of Cadair Idris which were laid down under the sea. In the past, there have been climates on earth that humans just couldn't survive, so I don't know why anyone tries to say that the climate isn't changing. (Apart from the World Was Created 6000 Years Ago brigade, of course.) As far as we know, we're still in an inter-glacial period. Whatever mechanism drove the switch between hot periods and cold periods could still be functioning and you have to add any effects due to human activity to the natural warming due to coming out of an ice age.
dashytoast From: dashytoast Date: June 9th, 2012 07:35 pm (UTC) (Link)
We've had our summer now. Don't you remember that really nice week in May? Three days after that, it was back to Autumn, and then onto winter. By my reckoning, we're back into spring now.

Seasons are certainly happening faster than they used to *g*
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 10th, 2012 09:55 am (UTC) (Link)
Hee! You're right. I remember that summer. It was nice while it lasted. :)
endlessrarities From: endlessrarities Date: June 23rd, 2012 01:40 pm (UTC) (Link)
It's been hellish, hasn't it? I'm glad you got through the floods okay - I was thinking of you. I thought you'd be out of the main epicentre, but wasn't entirely sure...
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