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Welsh cakes - Helen's journal and online home
In which an old dog attempts to learn new tricks.
heleninwales
heleninwales
Welsh cakes
Welsh cakes by Helen in Wales
Welsh cakes, a photo by Helen in Wales on Flickr.

7/52 for the group 52 in 2013

This week's theme: Food and/or drink

Here are some Welsh cakes that I made yesterday. They are very easy and delicious with butter. :)

Here is the recipe:

4 oz self-raising flour
2 oz butter or margarine
1 oz sugar
Pinch of mixed spice
1½ oz dried fruit of some kind (currants/sultanas/raisins)
A drop or two of milk to mix

Rub the butter into the flour.
Add the sugar, spice and fruit and mix them in.
Add a drop of milk to bind the mixture together into a soft dough.
Roll out the dough until it is about half and inch (1 cm) thick.
Cut into circles with a pastry cutter.
Cook on a griddle or heavy frying pan until done, flipping occasionally to ensure even cooking.

Eat hot or cold with butter.

Tags: , ,

23 comments or Leave a comment
Comments
athgarvan From: athgarvan Date: February 16th, 2013 12:18 pm (UTC) (Link)
um! lovely with afternoon my tea/coffee.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 16th, 2013 01:04 pm (UTC) (Link)
They are nice and home made ones are so much better than shop bought.
aellia From: aellia Date: February 16th, 2013 12:30 pm (UTC) (Link)
They look so good! Do you need any oil to cook them?
x
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 16th, 2013 01:03 pm (UTC) (Link)
You need the pan or griddle as oil free a possible, but obviously you don't want them to stick. What I do is to apply a drop of oil to the hot griddle then rub it around with a piece of paper kitchen towel, wiping it all off in the process and just leaving the merest trace of oil on the surface.
aellia From: aellia Date: February 16th, 2013 02:05 pm (UTC) (Link)
Thanks,Helen.
I'll try them tomorrow!
x
steepholm From: steepholm Date: February 16th, 2013 12:40 pm (UTC) (Link)
Keyboard, meet saliva.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 16th, 2013 01:05 pm (UTC) (Link)
Sorry, I have none left for you. We've just eaten the last ones with our lunch. :)
gillo From: gillo Date: February 16th, 2013 01:44 pm (UTC) (Link)
My Gran used to make those when we visited, but she scattered hers with a little caster sugar. I wish I had rescued her griddle. :-(
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 17th, 2013 01:46 pm (UTC) (Link)
The recipe book does actually tell you to sprinkle sugar on them and the shop bought ones always have sugar, but we prefer them less sugary.
artkouros From: artkouros Date: February 16th, 2013 01:50 pm (UTC) (Link)
Those look great. What is "mixed spice"?
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 17th, 2013 01:52 pm (UTC) (Link)
"Mixed spice" (according to the jar) is a mixture of ground cinnamon (cassia) 40%, ground coriander 38%, caraway, nutmeg 4%, ginger and cloves. It's a ready mixed spicy flavouring that is commonly used in cakes, puddings and biscuits in the UK.
artkouros From: artkouros Date: February 17th, 2013 04:43 pm (UTC) (Link)
Ah.
endlessrarities From: endlessrarities Date: February 16th, 2013 04:32 pm (UTC) (Link)
Yum! My grandmother used to make them...

I'm not usually a fan of fruit cake, so perhaps this is some kind of genetic throwback thing...
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 17th, 2013 01:53 pm (UTC) (Link)
I'm not a big fan of rich dark fruit cake, but I do like Welsh cakes. They're lovely with a cup of tea.
feodora From: feodora Date: February 16th, 2013 08:37 pm (UTC) (Link)
OMG
they look great. We had them in one of the b&b's when we walked on the Glynwr's Way 2011.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 17th, 2013 01:56 pm (UTC) (Link)
They are often eaten as part of a Welsh afternoon tea. Because they are so quick and easy to make and you cooked them on a griddle rather than in an oven, they can be made fresh. The mass produced ones sold in shops are never as nice.
birdsedge From: birdsedge Date: February 17th, 2013 04:45 pm (UTC) (Link)
Mmmmm. Thanks, I'm copying and keeping this recipe to try sometime very soon! Do you think they'd work with margarine and a drop of water to mix for my dairy-intolerant grandson?
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 17th, 2013 08:04 pm (UTC) (Link)
Margarine is absolutely fine. In fact I generally use it rather than butter. Water would probably be OK, though I've never tried it. You only need a very little, like when mixing pastry.

Otherwise I don't see why you couldn't use the milk substitute he generally drinks, soya, oat milk, whatever. Alternatively, you could try a little beaten egg. One of my Welsh cake recipes uses egg and milk for mixing.
birdsedge From: birdsedge Date: February 17th, 2013 08:15 pm (UTC) (Link)
He's egg intolerant as well, as is his dad, so one of the benefits is the lack of egg in the recipe. Oat milk would probably do the trick however.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 18th, 2013 09:10 am (UTC) (Link)
I did wonder whether eggs might also be a problem, but thought I'd mention that option anyway. I'm sure the oat milk will be absolutely fine as a substitute. It only takes a splash of liquid, just enough to moisten and bind the mix together so it shouldn't alter the flavour.
kaishin108 From: kaishin108 Date: February 19th, 2013 02:13 am (UTC) (Link)
Like a scone but fried? Interesting. Fry in butter?

Edited at 2013-02-19 02:13 am (UTC)
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: February 19th, 2013 11:12 am (UTC) (Link)
It's not exactly fried, it's baked on the griddle one side at a time. Only the tiniest film of oil is required, just enough to stop them sticking, like you would grease a try when baking scones in the oven. I moisten a paper kitchen towel with a drop of sunflower oil and rub that over the griddle. You could use butter, but it might burn at the temperature required for baking.

Basically, it's the ancient "cooking things on a hot stone over an open fire" method that has been used for thousands of years for making flat bread and thin cakes of all kinds. You can in fact do ordinary scones the same way, though you need to roll them out thinner in order to make sure they cook right through.
kaishin108 From: kaishin108 Date: February 19th, 2013 02:29 pm (UTC) (Link)
Thank you! Now I understand better. And I do have a cast iron griddle that sits on two of my burners, so I just might have to give this a try, I think DH would love them with blueberries!

Edited at 2013-02-19 02:29 pm (UTC)
23 comments or Leave a comment