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Handful of coins - Helen's journal and online home
In which an old dog attempts to learn new tricks.
heleninwales
heleninwales
Handful of coins
Handful of coins by Helen in Wales
Handful of coins, a photo by Helen in Wales on Flickr.

15/52 for the group T189ers alphabet challenge

The set theme was: H is for Handful

You know how sometimes you are in a queue and there's a little old lady buying something and insisting on giving the exact right change -- well I have become that little old lady. :)

It's not entirely my fault. What is it with men and loose change? Our son once gave me a large jar of coins he'd been saving and then decided he couldn't be bothered dealing with. I got rid of those mostly in the coffee machine at work. Unfortunately these days I can't think of any machines that take copper, so I'm slowly slowly spending the pot of coins my elderly Dad gave me by giving exact change whenever I can.

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Comments
carl_allery From: carl_allery Date: April 12th, 2013 06:59 pm (UTC) (Link)
Some supermarkets have the big change machines you can pour your collected coins into and they give you a coupon or something you can exchange at customer sevices. It has to be spent in-store, but if you're going to spend the money anyhow ...

I have a couple of jars/tins of 2p pieces and must get them changed up at some point. The problem is that I empty my poacket of change at night, but only put the highvalue coins back in, so the coppers build up. Hm, although I'm also wondering if they might make a decent weight for exercises ... ;)
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: April 13th, 2013 08:09 am (UTC) (Link)
I acquired some stones from the local river to use as weights. I probably ought to start using them again because the painful elbow has been better for some time.

I started with a pebble in each hand, worked up to a larger pebble and then graduated to a stone getting on for cobble size.

As you probably don't have a convenient river with a stony bed handy, a pile of coins fastened into a sock ought to work equally well. :)
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: April 13th, 2013 08:15 am (UTC) (Link)
Neither of our two small local supermarkets have change machines, unfortunately, but by keeping at it, you can eventually get rid of small change.

You have to remember to tell the checkout person up front, so if they say, "That's three pounds twenty," you need to say, "Oh, I have the 20p!" and immediately start rummaging in the purse. That way when you give them a tenner, plus 20p in coins, they can enter the amount correctly and then give you a nice round number of notes and pound coins back.
coth From: coth Date: April 12th, 2013 07:13 pm (UTC) (Link)
Me too, though in my case it's 10 years of daughter's money bx copper which was how she chose to pay me back for an on-line credit card transaction made on her behalf.
veronica_milvus From: veronica_milvus Date: April 12th, 2013 07:43 pm (UTC) (Link)
I take mine down to the Oxfam shop and fill up their collecting box. It drives them crazy!
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: April 13th, 2013 08:17 am (UTC) (Link)
If Dad had given me more, I might have been driven to that, but he gave me a large yoghurt pot almost full and now, just a few weeks later, I've got rid of over half, so I will keep at it.
khiemtran From: khiemtran Date: April 13th, 2013 12:44 am (UTC) (Link)
Ha! I did that this morning! (I paid for our breakfast in a cafe using all my loose change.)
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: April 13th, 2013 08:22 am (UTC) (Link)
I've discovered that as long as you tell the checkout person upfront, it's not too hard to get rid of coins. For example, if they say, "That's three pounds twenty, please," you need to say, "Oh, I have the 20p!" and immediately start rummaging in the purse. Thus, when you give them a tenner plus 20p in coins, they can enter the amount correctly and then give you a nice round number of notes and pound coins back. If you give them the tenner first and let them enter that, trying to offer coins late leads to utter confusion. :)

My main problem is that I use cash so rarely these days. All our regular expenditure such as groceries and diesel go on the debit card and clothes etc are purchased with the credit card. I also noticed yesterday that our Co-op supermarket has now introduced the Pay-wave technology, so from now on I could pay even small amounts using a card. We're not quite a cashless society, but it can't be all that far off now.
khiemtran From: khiemtran Date: April 14th, 2013 02:33 am (UTC) (Link)
Yes, I find I'm using my card more and more now, especially since you can now make small payments without needing a PIN or signature. That tiny improvement in speed is just enough to make it more convenient than fumbling with cash and it's been a real tipping point for me.
pennski From: pennski Date: April 13th, 2013 02:35 pm (UTC) (Link)
I believe, but it may not be a fact, that shops are not obliged to take more than about 20p in loose change.
I always used to stoop to pick up stray pennies on the street, now I sometimes pass them by.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: April 13th, 2013 03:08 pm (UTC) (Link)
No, you're right. There are limits on what is and isn't legal tender. However, rather than try to pay with piles of copper, I'm very slowly getting rid of it by adding the odd pennies to the amount I pay with notes and larger coins so that I get a whole number of pounds in the change.

For example, if something costs £2.54, I'll hand over three pound coins and 4p, which means I get a 50p coin in change rather than yet more copper. It takes a bit of mental arithmetic, but it's probably good for keeping my brain active. :)
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