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Stop for a moment... - Helen's journal and online home
In which an old dog attempts to learn new tricks.
heleninwales
heleninwales
Stop for a moment...
...to notice that the neighbours' rhododendron bush has been shedding flowers.

Fallen rhododendron flowers cropped

Flowers are always ephemeral, but I don't think the rain and high winds have helped. :(

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Current Mood: calm calm

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Comments
asakiyume From: asakiyume Date: June 15th, 2013 04:47 pm (UTC) (Link)
They look like tiny hats that maybe a troop of very small schoolchildren have shed as the day grew warm.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 15th, 2013 05:08 pm (UTC) (Link)
Hats! Yes, that's it. Little abandoned hats.

I was intrigued that they have all landed the same way up. I would have thought it would be more random, especially with the wind, but it seems not.
halfmoon_mollie From: halfmoon_mollie Date: June 15th, 2013 06:52 pm (UTC) (Link)
or that the fairies used to stay out of the rain....
jhetley From: jhetley Date: June 15th, 2013 04:55 pm (UTC) (Link)
Our local rhododendrons have also started dropping flowers. Cover the ground in spots . . .
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 15th, 2013 05:06 pm (UTC) (Link)
I'm not sure why the neighbour planted a rhododendron because they are considered vegitata non grata around here. They grow so well that they behave like weeds and overrun the mountainsides and choke out the native vegetation. The leaves are poisonous, so nothing eats them and the National Park spends a fortune on exterminating them. But they re-grow! Leave the tiniest bit of root and they will return from the dead. :(
jhetley From: jhetley Date: June 15th, 2013 06:15 pm (UTC) (Link)
They're semi-native here (south of here) and hardy enough to survive Maine winters. They will take over, without aggressive intervention.
halfmoon_mollie From: halfmoon_mollie Date: June 15th, 2013 06:51 pm (UTC) (Link)
They look like discarded ladies' hankies...the real cloth kind, I mean, perhaps left after a good cry. Or, judging from the number, after several good cries.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 17th, 2013 03:42 pm (UTC) (Link)
I've loved all the whimsical suggestions as to what these look like. Thank you. :)
khiemtran From: khiemtran Date: June 15th, 2013 11:45 pm (UTC) (Link)
It looks like a tiny tribe of nomads have pitched their tents on the grassy steppe.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 17th, 2013 03:42 pm (UTC) (Link)
I've loved all the whimsical suggestions as to what these look like. Thank you. :)
readthisandweep From: readthisandweep Date: June 16th, 2013 08:18 am (UTC) (Link)
Flower Faery hats!

http://www.flower-fairies-pictures.co.uk/ff/gallery.asp

And a very sweet image.

heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 17th, 2013 03:43 pm (UTC) (Link)
The fallen blossoms do very strongly resemble faery hats, as depicted in flower fairy books. :)
carl_allery From: carl_allery Date: June 16th, 2013 10:35 am (UTC) (Link)
There's somethng really wonderful about this photo - perhaps because we usually see flowers the other way up and despite having dropped from the bush, they're still mostly fresh rather than drying or decaying. And yes, I have to second the faery hat comments, although I suspect most of the faery paintings I've seen have actually used this petal shape and colour.

If you've had high winds, this probably explains the orientation of the flowers as the other way up the wind would catch the petals and flip them over. This way is clearly the most stable with a wider, heavier base.
heleninwales From: heleninwales Date: June 17th, 2013 03:44 pm (UTC) (Link)
Now you put it like that, it does make sense. I was thinking of how they would fall, but they have probably been arranged by the wind after they landed.
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